Responding to an active shooter in the library: protecting patrons and staff from a rare but catastrophic event

Responding to an active shooter in the library: protecting patrons and staff from a rare but catastrophic event

Evento arancelado

Modalidad:  en línea

Organizado por:  Library 2.0

Fecha: 20 de noviembre de 2018

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Más información:

PRESENTED BY:
Dr. Steve Albrecht, author, Library Security: Better Communications, Safer Facilities (ALA, 2015)

DATE & TIME:
Tuesday, November 20th, 2018, 4:00 pm US-EST (1 hour). Click here for time zone conversions. The recording of the Webinar will be available immediately following the live broadcast, and available to all who sign up.

COST:
$99
 – includes participating live (not required), lifetime access to the recording, access to attendee discussion forum, and a certificate of attendance. (For group or other purchases, please email [email protected].)

TO SIGN UP:
Click HERE TO REGISTER. (You will first need to be a member of Library 2.0 community and be logged in. Click HERE to sign up for free and we’ll approve you quickly.)

DESCRIPTION:
Recent mass shootings in public places should remind all library leaders and their staffs to review their emergency response plans to this disturbing event. These incidents are often foreshadowed by warning signs and specific pre-attack behaviors by disturbed patrons that may be noticed by staff members.

This 60-minute webinar is led by Dr. Steve Albrecht, a national leader in both workplace violence prevention and library security. He’ll provide safety tools and security techniques to empower library employees at every level, not frighten them. This includes his discussion of how some people make threats and others pose threats; the national response protocol known as Run-Hide-Fight; how to safely evacuate all patrons and staff; how to shelter in place in the library; and how to best protect patrons and staff from an armed attacker. Dr. Albrecht will also discuss why these perpetrators strike in the first place and what we can learn from past cases as a way to both understand and stop them.

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